Pete Writes

typewriterPete’s Writing Portfolio

 


Late Afternoon Office Hours: The Gleaming

The photo affixed to the modular unit
In my windowless, cement-block office
(The space flickeringly, florescently lit)
Shows her, her hair still then un-frosted.

She kneels on iron-red Superior stone.
One boy, aged three, in leg braces, perches
Within her latent rescue-reach, gazing down
At his brother, aged five, head bent, who launches

On clear water a two-masted schooner.
Her cobalt fleece glows with white glaze
Gathered from the lake’s cloud-cloaked
Yet luminescent skies.

In the mini-lake, shimmering figures of my family—
All but the one still a glimmer in my eye—
Are mirrored in the mere:
Three rippled shapes made by water and sky.

–Pete Beurskens
September 20, 2016


 

Scything Lessons
A Villanelle, Roughly

Swing the scythe and whistle as you mow.
If brome grass should slow you up and make you strain,
Suppress the urge to glimpse the end of your row.

You’ll want to begin when the hay still wears its dew.
Or if it fell lightly, commence just after a rain.
Then swing the scythe and whistle as you mow.

An Austrian scythe is really the way to go.
The snath is light, and there’s poetry in the name,
Thus reducing the urge to glimpse the end of your row.

Alfalfa is stemmy, yet moist and laid easily low,
But if your scything slows, stop and whet the blade.
Then swing the scythe and whistle as you mow.

The bellied blade should ride along the loam.
If it bites the dirt, then stop to adjust the tang,
Yet suppress the urge to glimpse the end of your row.

Remember, if you lose your edge, take time to freshen the hone,
For it profit a man nothing to muscle through the grain.
Rather, swing the scythe and whistle as you mow–
And you’ll avoid the urge to glimpse the end of your row.

–Pete Beurskens